Suicide Squad (2016) – A Ramble (no spoilers)

Suicide Squad (2016) – A Ramble (no spoilers)

I’m not going to lie I went into Suicide Squad with quite low expectations and whilst I usually like to go into a film pretty open minded I had sort of began to form a few opinions based on what I had heard about the reshoots and editing process of the film.

My main reservation was that Warner Bros have run into this massive emsemble style film too quickly in order to keep up with the Marvel Cinematic Universe hype. The problem with this is that they try to introduce too many characters to the DC film universe at the same time causing the film to seem rushed and bitty, and I’m assuming it could be very confusing to someone who hadn’t read any of the comics. As a result of this the film begins to feel like pieces of several different films sewed together none of which really formed a coherent narrative.

Another problem I found with the film was that with all the reshoots etc the film has some super jarring editing at certain parts (especially in the scenes with the Joker), with random jump cuts which, to me, seemed to be obviously attempting to hide that they cut most of that particular flash back or sequence which just pulled me out of the film too much. I think this is probably another reprecussion of the fact the film was that the script was rushed in about six weeks etc and I feel it really shows in the final product.

The best thing for me about this film was the acting; in particular Will Smith, Margot Robbie, Viola Davis, and Jay Hernandez’s performances. I could really see their efforts in developing these characters and feel like they’re performances were entertaining and they seem to have formed their characters pretty well from what I saw of them. However, I found Cara Delevingne’s performance was very forced and also brought me out of the narrative at times. In terms of Jared Leto as the Joker I’m not too sure, I feel we didn’t see a full enough scene featuring the Joker to fully form an opinion of Leto’s performance, and it’s easy to write off a performance when you’re barely shown any of it so I’ll hold onto hope for him. In terms of the rest of the cast it seemed to me they did a decent job based on what the screentime and script allowed.

My final thoughts on the film are that it basically seems to be a stepping stone into another solo DC film whether that be a Deadshot film, a Harley Quinn/Joker one or simply to set up more characters in order to use them in more Batman films rather than actually trying to carry the storylines of the actual Suicide Squad you see in the comics and it probably would’ve been more useful to have had the individual films before having an emsemble film like this. Basically, this film showed potential and I found aspects of it entertaining but I feel over all it fell flat and it leaves me wondering what’s to come for the DC universe on screen. (Let’s all hope Wonder Woman pulls through for us all.)

Sooo dare I ask, what did you think of the film?

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The Little Prince – A kind of review (lots of thoughts)

The Little Prince – A kind of review (lots of thoughts)

So Netflix UK released The Little Prince and as a sucker for a good animated film, of course, I had to watch it immediately. The Little Prince is based on the children’s book by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. Having never read the book, I went into the film blind, knowing practically nothing about the story having only seen the trailer which I didn’t find hindering to my experience at all.

Let’s get the obvious out of the way. This was one of the most visually pleasing films I’ve ever seen (at least in terms of animated film). The film uses a mixture of animation styles the 3D computer generated animation style we’ve become most familiar to in recent cinema history. However, the parts of the film in which the aviator is telling the young girl the story of The Little Prince is animated in a stop motion style which allows the director to bring to life illustrations similar to those in the book keeping the feel of the original story perfectly. (Which I have since looked up in preparation for this post.)

Narratively, the film adaptation adds a character of a young girl who lives quite a mature life for her age, filled with regimens and schedules, until she meets the aviator (who narrates the story in the book) who has grown old and is quite eccentric in his old age, the girls develops a friendship with the girl and tells her the story of The Little Prince. I felt framing the original books narrative within the narrative of this little girl allowed the story to be really compelling as it allowed us as viewers to visually see the effect teaching  the morals within the story may have on a child, which is really beautiful to watch.

That gives me the perfect segway to talk about the film thematically, possibly my favorite part of the film. The book and therefore the film is filled with a wealth of themes and morals to learn but, put simply, the story is about growing up and we should not fear growing up but rather forgetting what it was like to be a child, a moral which is perfectly personified through the character of the elderly aviator. The film is also successful in teaching all the other morals which the little prince learns from each adult he encounters in the book, my personal favourite being the fox. But I’ll let you discover some of these on your own, otherwise, this blog post would be super long.

So basically, in conclusion, I absolutely loved this film and would highly recommend checking it out. It is visually stunning and carries more beautiful meanings than I could even fathom a film aimed at children would. I would especially recommend this film if you’ve been having a rough time lately as it definitely boosts morale! I hope you enjoyed this sort of review (more just my thoughts really) and I’d be really interested in hearing what you thought if you’ve watched the film! Or have you read the book? Who’s your favourite character? I’ll no doubt be back posting more thoughts on films soon.

Thanks for reading,

Kathy.